Is talk cheap?

                                photo(9)

                   photo(11)

                   photo(12)

anthropologie tupelo dress/jcrew ruffled cardigan/seychelles pumps

The other day, a friend and I got to talking about the overt frequency of those who use Facebook to update everyone on everything. You know the guilty-as-charged status: “So glad I got my Starbucks today. Now I can deal with Monday!”, or “I took my daughter to the hair salon and it cost me $200. Gosh, kids are expensive!” We were reflecting on where the need comes from, to document everything and share with everyone to see, hear, and read. And before I get any further with my assessment, I am well aware of the facts – me, myself, and I take pictures most days and post along with ramblings, about my musings on a public forum. But let me be clear, this isn’t a moment for critique as much as observation and intrigue.

I remember while growing up, it would be a rare treat to catch a glimpse of actors getting caught doing normal, everyday things. There was great curiosity about what celebrities were like, amazement at the kind of lives they must lead, but they were always far away, as if existing in their own island. In today’s time, we have multiple sources of entertainment covering “important” details, such as who’s dating who or which actress is or isn’t on a diet, starving herself for attention. There seems to be a consistent need of not only sharing anything and everything but also tuning in to everyone else’s details.

What I want to know is, when did it become important to let everything out and not hold anything in? Why is it relevant to be current on everyone, celebrities and each other? Does it promote gossip and superficial concern, and what ever happened to being satisfied from within and not getting public recognition?

It’s an interesting phenomenon, social media, because even though it can nurture a culture of over-sharing, it also creates connections among people that would have otherwise never crossed paths. So while I agree that social media has created positive shifts in communication practices and crossed over cultural grounds, has it also made us blabbermouths (and I mean that in the best way possible)? Is the need to share a result of available communication avenues, or was the need there all along – for recognition and acceptance?

 

Drop me a line and be existential with me for a minute!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s